Saturday, December 15, 2018

Giving Thanks This Holiday Season

dr jane
Dr. Jane Bicks, DVM

Courtesy of Life's Abundance Blog Post 12/13/18


Honestly, I was just getting used to it being 2018. Where does the time go?

For me, the holidays are a time of joy and reflection. A time to celebrate our family and friends. To fondly remember those we’ve lost. To find inspiration and hope. To share with those who are less fortunate than ourselves. To do something meaningful and unexpected for someone in need or having an especially hard time. To my mind, there is so much to be grateful for and so much to cradle in our hearts.

Perhaps more than anything, I'm truly thankful to be part of a company that is so focused on helping others improve their quality of life. A company that works to make life better for both people and their companion animals.

I consider it a great privilege to work with such a dedicated team. And to communicate with you through this blog, where we try to share valuable information to help people be informed and entertained. And, of course, to bring you updates about the vitally important work of The Dr. Jane Foundation.

Our charitable foundation has achieved great things this past year! In addition to 18 financial awards given to worthy animal rescues through our usual grant process, we were also able to provide emergency funding to two groups that coordinated assistance to injured and homeless animals displaced by devastating fires that raged in California last month. As many of you know, the Camp Fire was the deadliest wildfire in California's history. The emergency response of the last two groups on the following list of grant recipients made a tremendous difference for all kinds of animals, and for that, we are extremely grateful. Without further ado, here's the list of amazing rescue organizations that received funding from our non-profit this year.

Paw Warriors, Inc. of Spring Hill, FL
BARC Humane Society of Quitman, GA
People & Pets Together of Minneapolis, MN
Paws for Life of Youngsville, NC
Rescues Unlimited of Gregory, SD
ACTion Programs for Animals of Las Cruces, NM
Animal Rescue of Southern Colorado of Antonito, CO
Bounce Animal Rescue of Fort Collins, CO
Boxer Aid and Rescue Coalition, Inc. of Tallahassee, FL
Eastern Plains Animal Welfare Alliance of Burlington, CO
MeeowzResQ of Orange, CA
My Second Home Rescue of Carr, CO
New England Society for Abandoned Animals of Barnstable, MA
Res-Que, Ltd of Reno, NV
The Animal Interest League & Sanctuary (dba TAILS) of Delta, CO
Rehoboth Animal Advocates of Rehoboth, MA
Herd U Needed A Home Rescue of Bend, OR
Greyhounds in Motion of Winter Park, FL
Humane Society of Ventura County of Ojai, CA
North Valley Animal Disaster Group of Chico, CA

The generosity and patronage of our customers enables our foundation to continue its good works. From the bottom of my heart, I thank each and every one of you. Every time you shop at Life's Abundance, a contribution is made to our funding. And we are very proud that over 95% of that money goes directly to the organizations that need the most help.


While the work of the foundation is a vital part of Life's Abundance, our central commitment is devotion to the people who use our products: you inspire us. Without your support and feedback we would not be the company we are today, and from the very core of my being, I thank you. Rest assured, we will continue to improve our innovative health formulations and create new, cutting-edge products to help improve the health and longevity of companion animals. With the combined efforts of our committed and motivated team, we can surely make 2019 our most successful year ever!

Thank you for the privilege of working with you and your families, for the trust you place in our products, and for all you do to make the world a better place for companion animals.

From all of us here at Life’s Abundance, we wish you and yours a Meowy Christmas and Happy Paw-nukkah!

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Holiday Gifts for Cats and Dogs

Holiday Gifts for Cats and Dogs by Life's Abundance

Limited Quantities so get yours today!
cat gift

This Gift for Cats Contains:

  • Full-sized bag of Turkey Heart Freeze Dried Treats
  • Full-sized bag of Cat Treats for Healthy Skin & Coat
  • Delicious dose of nutrition with full-sized Wellness Supplement
  • Instinctive Choice (one 3-oz can)
  • Fun and festive toy assortment (may vary)
  • Adorable, reusable gift box


A $45.00 retail value!
ONLY $22.95



   -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





dog gift

This Gift for Dogs Contains:

  • Full-sized bag of Turkey Heart Freeze Dried Treats
  • Full-sized bag of Tasty Rewards Nutritional Treats
  • Fun plush squeak toy (may vary)
  • Adorable, reusable gift box)


A $45.00 retail value!
ONLY $25.95

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

How does my cat want to be fed?

How Your Cat REALLY Wants to be Fed

Courtesy of Life's Abundance Blog 11/20/18

What does your cat’s dish look like? Is it plastic, stainless steel, or maybe ceramic? No matter what you’re imagining, it's almost certainly one of these types of cat food dishes.

But is that about to change? What if the best answer to "how does my cat really want to be fed?" is, “not in a dish at all!”

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP), a collection of the best and brightest minds in feline medicine, just released a 2018 consensus statement on the feeding of cats.1 

Contrary to the usual debate over cat food which centers on wet versus dry, this discussion focuses not on the ‘what’ of cat food, but the ‘how’.

Here in the States, we often encourage people to keep their cats indoors in order to keep them safe from predators, and from themselves having an adverse effect on native bird populations. While an indoor life is the safest option, this doesn’t provide them much opportunity to act like, well, cats. Outdoor cats routinely roam over ranges as far as two miles, so it’s no wonder their behavior changes when they are confined to a 2,000 square foot house.

As hunters, cats are hardwired to hunt small prey. Unlike a snake, which may go days or weeks in between feedings, a cat in the wild eats multiple small prey every day. The typical household practice of filling a food bowl twice a day doesn’t do a whole lot to fulfill this instinctive need. Without the job of hunting to keep cats occupied, they may become bored and overweight. It may also contribute to stress, particularly if the household contains multiple cats sharing a single food source.

Fortunately, there is a way to manage this issue without making all indoor cats become outdoor cats. The AAFP offers several suggestions to better approximate natural cat behavior in the home, including:

  • Feeding multiple smaller meals a day versus one or two large ones. Automated feeders can do this on a timer.
  • Ensuring multiple food sources for multi-cat households.
  • Using puzzle feeders to encourage natural hunting behavior.

kitten

I love puzzle feeders and recommend them routinely for both dogs and, now, for cats. They are based on the very simple principle that companion animals need to work for their food. You can find elaborate feeders that require pets to remove pieces and move doors around, and others that are as simple as a ball with holes in it that drops food out as it rolls. However, puzzle feeders made specifically for felines encourage their natural pouncing and tossing behavior. You can buy feeders for both wet and dry food, so find one that works best with whichever Life’s Abundance premium cat food your sweet kitty prefers.

Although we’ve domesticated cats and dogs, there’s no reason that we can’t continue to adapt and accommodate their instinctual behaviors, especially as our understanding of their physical, mental and emotional needs continues to expand. I’ve spoken to multiple behaviorists who recommend puzzle feeders as a part of any treatment for behavioral issues in cats, from aggression to inappropriate elimination to over-grooming. It’s such a simple thing to do, so why not give it a try with your cat? We feel confident that your little hunter will be super pleased with the change.

Stay well, and happy hunting to your kitty!

Dr. Jessica Vogelsang, DVM


Dr. Vogelsang, DVM



REFERENCES

1. https://www.catvets.com/guidelines/practice-guidelines/how-to-feed

 

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Life's Abundance wet canned cat food

instinctive choice

Life's Abundance Canned Cat Food.

Life's Abundance wet food called Instinctive choice is grain free and contains quality ingredients for all life stages.







Cats have been thriving on this recipe for more than a decade, yet this all life stage food remains a revolutionary formula because it provides sustenance that’s modeled after the way cats have eaten in the wild for millennia.

Evolved from big, desert-roaming predators who acquired fluids primarily from prey, domesticated house cats still have weak thirst drives to this day. That’s why this premium canned food has added moisture content, to adequately hydrate the body and help support healthy urinary functions. 

Every serving of this premium canned cuisine includes optimal amounts of added vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and omega fatty acids, all to help maintain a healthy, happy body. 

Simmered in a delicious broth that’s seasoned with a hint of rosemary, this succulent feast will put a little roar in your cat’s day.

With Instinctive Choice, you can finally give your cat what she truly craves, with the water content and nutrition she needs to truly thrive.


Please visit our Life's Abundance Cat food site for all products 

Saturday, October 20, 2018

World’s Creepiest Cat Legends

World’s Creepiest Cat Legends

Courtesy of Life's Abundance

If we asked you to name something spooky about cats, you’d probably mention a black cat crossing your path leading to misfortune. But a bit of bad luck pales in comparison to some of the terrifying myths of times past.

Cats are undeniably enigmatic. There’s just something about those haunting eyes, their silent, furtive movements and a wail that reminds some of babies crying. Whatever the cause, that air of mystery has lead humans over the course of human history to entertain a whole host of seriously scary - or even downright strange - beliefs involving felines. Honestly, it would be easy to fill a book’s worth of information of this topic, but we’ve culled that down to a manageable list of five. After reading these decidedly spooky superstitions, you’ll feel like the scaredy cat. But don’t worry, your sweet kitty will be there to comfort you.

Sith Cats

A fairy creature from both Celtic and Scottish mythology, Sith Cats were large black cats with splash of white fur on its chest. While Sith Cats were believed to be spectral in nature, they were inspired by actual creatures known as Kellas cats, a hybrid between wildcats and domestic cats only found in Scotland. They were believed to have nefarious purposes, including a desire to consume souls immediately after death. Every year on Samhain (which we now celebrate as Halloween), houses where an offering of a saucer of milk was left outside would be blessed by the being, while those that did not would suffer a curse. Fun Fact: The Scots believed the Cat Sith was actually a witch that had the ability to transform into a cat, but that the witch was limited to only nine transformations in a lifetime. Scholars believe this is the origin of the belief that cats enjoy nine lives!

The Matagot

First conceived in the oral traditions of southern France, the Matagot (also referred to as Mandagot) is a mischievous spirit. While it was capable of shapeshifting into a number of animals (such as a rat, a fox, a dog and even a cow), its preferred form was that of a black cat. Matagots were considered evil in nature, but they could be trapped whereupon it would take a largely beneficial role for its captor. The legend states that if you lured one from its hiding spot with a serving of fresh, meaty chicken and then scooped it up and walked straight home without looking behind you, it would become a source of dependable good fortune. There were a couple of catches, as there always are with magical beings. First, before every meal, you would have to feed the first mouthful of your food and the first sip of your drink to the Matagot. If you managed to stick to that routine, each morning you would find a gold coin. Second, you would have to release the creature from this servitude well prior to your death. Otherwise, your last days on earth would assuredly be agonizingly painful.



The Bakeneko of Nabeshima (aka, Vampire Cat)

The origin of this terrifying legend is from 16th century Japan. One of the more frightening creatures, this cat not only sought to devour humans, but immediately afterwards would assume their victim’s exact likeness, whereupon they would attempt to deceive other humans, thus continuing a vicious cycle. Aside from their shapeshifting abilities, they were believed to wear strange hats for dancing, perfectly imitate human speech, have the ability to place hexes on people (especially those who were known for their cruelty to cats), possession, and even a penchant for hiding in mountainous locales where they would tame and train wolves to assist them in attacking weary travelers far from home.

The Wampus Cat

Believed to originate among the Cherokee people, the mythical Wampus Cat is a common staple of Appalachian folklore. A shapeshifter, its most common manifestation was as a large, wild cat, but it could also take the shape of a beautiful woman. It was considered a ferocious creature, capable of driving even the bravest of warriors to the brink of insanity. J.K. Rowling’s fans may recognize this magical being as a source for the hair that Garrick Ollivander used in the creation of certain magic wands. Fun Fact: the word “catawampus,” which means “out of alignment” but also “fierce and destructive,” arises from this myth.


The Black Cat of KillaKee

Like all of our the supernatural kitties, this Irish creature's origins began centuries ago. However, sightings have continued into modern times, which makes this arguably the most frightening. Like the tall tales that are common in the area, this one is attached to a particular great house. But we can assure you, nothing like this ever happened on Downton Abbey. Located in Dublin, the Killakee House was rumored to be haunted by a spectacularly creepy cat. Though technically it stalked the grounds, unlike other big cat sightings in the UK, the main difference is that this cat is supernatural.

In 1968, a young couple bought the Killakee House and began much needed renovations. Within days, workers started hearing strange noises and sensing things that quite frankly were decidedly spooky. Things came to a head when the workers were shocked by the sudden appearance of a towering black cat with eyes that "glowed like a demon." Just as the renovators started freaking out, the specter vanished. Afterwards, the new owners listened politely to the story, but didn't put much stock in the tale. And then ... the creature appeared to each of the new owners in turn. The giant apparition appeared in every corner of the house, despite locked doors and windows, stalking the couple with its penetrating stare and toothy snarls. The newlyweds sought help from the Catholic Church, whereupon an exorcism was performed on the estate. For a few months, everything was quiet, and the two believed their nightmare was finally over. Sometime later, however, a group of actors visiting the estate held a séance, whereupon the devilish creature returned, bringing with it two frightening ghosts dressed in nuns' garb. And thus, the nightmare continues.






this beautiful baby is NOT a scary legend
(just adorable)

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Healthy Start for Cats

Healthy Start Pack for Cats

This is a WONDERFUL idea to give to a new pet parent or give to you for your awesome favorite feline (s)

There are two Healthy start packs, one is grain free and the other is not.




HEALTHY START PACK
healthy start pack
  • One 6.6 lb. bag of Life’s Abundance All Life Stage Cat Food – Our premium, veterinarian-formulated kibble features select ingredients to help your cat achieve and maintain optimum health.
  • One case of Life’s Abundance Instinctive Choice Canned Cat Food – This premium canned food is formulated to provide your cat with a meal that is similar in nutrition and moisture to how a feline would feed in the wild.
  • One bottle of Life’s Abundance Wellness Food Supplement – These savory nuggets provide a wide variety of nutritious ingredients in a superior formula created to enhance your cat’s daily diet.
  • One 4 oz. bag of Life’s Abundance Gourmet Cat Treats for Healthy Skin & Coat – These tasty treats contain nutrients to help your cat maintain healthy skin and a strong, resilient coat.








HEALTHY START PACK - GRAIN FREE

healthy start pack grain free

One 6 lb. bag of Grain-Free All Life Stage Cat Food - Our premium, holistically-formulated kibble features select ingredients to help your cat achieve and maintain optimum health.
  •  One case of Instinctive Choice All Life Stage Cat Food - This premium canned food is formulated to provide your cat with a grain-free meal that is similar in nutrition and moisture to how a feline would feed in the wild. 
  • One 2-oz. bottle of Ultra-Pure Fish Oil for Pets - Our fish oils contain at least 30% EPA and DHA, an ideal concentration for the overall health of your cat. The oil is in a triglyceride form, which is highly bioavailable and without added flavors so it has a natural taste that cats love.









For more information on Life's Abundance cat food, click here

Friday, September 21, 2018

Wellness Food Supplement for Cats


Life's Abundance
wellness food supplement







  • Helps maintain overall health
  • Naturally nutritious ingredients from real food
  • The perfect complement to our premium foods
  • Made in the USA


YUMMY!!!








Making the most of nature’s bounty, our Wellness Food Supplement utilizes micronutrients that are holistically balanced. Every ingredient is carefully selected for the vital role it plays in the preservation of feline health.

• Chicken, herring & liver meals 
• Chicken cartilage 
• Salmon meal
• Dried tomato pomace & alfalfa sprouts 
• Flaxseed meal & fish oil 
• Taurine 
• And so much more! 



and of course if you want information about Life's Abundance Cat food, click here



Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Toxic Medicines for Cats and Dogs

This is great information courtesy of Life's Abundance and  Dr. Vogelsang.

5 Meds that are Toxic to Pets


The past four months have been a blur of training, cleaning up and chasing around after our new puppy, Dakota. I wouldn’t change it for the world, but I did forget how much trouble a curious puppy can get into! Last week I found Dakota chomping on a travel-sized bag of trail mix that included chocolate covered raisins. Chocolate covered raisins! How did that even get into the house? I still don’t know where it came from, but fortunately I was able to intervene before he opened the bag.

Most people know that chocolate and grapes can be toxic for pets, but potential threats can lurk elsewhere in your home. Prescription and over-the-counter medications are among the top reasons people call into poison control hotlines for both kids and pets, and with good reason. Here are the top five medications of concern when it comes to pets and toxicity:

1. Ibuprofen.  As the active ingredient in common over-the-counter products such as Advil and Motrin, ibuprofen is unfortunately ingested by pets both accidentally and intentionally by owners unaware of its potential side effects. Cats are particularly sensitive to its effects. The most common clinical sign is vomiting or gastrointestinal ulcers, though it can also lead to kidney damage. Other NSAIDS such as Aleve can also be problematic.

2. Acetaminophen. Speaking of pain medications, acetaminophen-containing products such as Tylenol are also high on the list of pet poisons. Like ibuprofen, cats are particularly sensitive to the effects of this medication, and one pill is enough to kill a cat. Both cats and dogs can experience liver damage as a result of this medication, starting with decreased appetite and leading to yellow skin (a sign of jaundice), swollen paws or difficulty breathing. Acetaminophen is a common ingredient in combination products like cough and flu remedies, so be careful to read the label on your products!

3. Stimulants. ADHD medications such as Adderall and Ritalin can be toxic to companion animals. Sadly, they are more likely to be ingested by pets as they are often prescribed for children who may be less vigilant about keeping the pills out of the reach of the household dogs and cats. Signs of ingestion may include dilated pupils, seizures, shaking or hyperactivity.

4. Antidepressants. Antidepressants fall into several categories depending on their mechanism of action. In the most commonly prescribed medications (such as Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft and Effexor) work by increasing the concentration of neurotransmitters in the brain. When overdosed, the brain can be flooded with these chemicals and pets can experience a variety of symptoms such as depression, hyperexcitability, seizures and vomiting.

5. Vitamin D. As doctors are starting to diagnose Vitamin D deficiency more often, this is a common supplement in people’s medicine cabinets. When there is too much in the body, blood calcium levels also rise, resulting in serious damage to the kidneys. It is so effective at causing damage that it's commonly used in rat poisons such as d-Con. Vitamin D might appear on rodenticide labels as “cholecalciferol,” and should be avoided.

There’s no time like the present to ensure any of these items in your house are safely secured away from prying pet paws. If you suspect your dog or cat has ingested any of these harmful substances, call your veterinarian or a pet poison control helpline ASAP!


Dr. Vogelsang
Dr. Vogelsang


Thursday, August 30, 2018

Cats: Skin and Coat Issues



Skin & Coat Formula

for dogs and CATS



Skin & Coat Formula







The nutrients featured in this formula can yield several health-promoting benefits. Here are just some of the highlights of how this supplement works …

Vitamin E and zinc help increase the effectiveness of the skin-nourishing omega-3 fatty acids.

Vitamin A helps cells to grow and supports the skin’s natural oil layer, helping to keep it healthy and supple.

Vitamin C supports healthy collagen development.

Seven different B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, d-pantothenic acid, niacin, pyridoxine, B12 and biotin) work with the other nutrients in this formula to aid in the many complex chemical reactions required for healthy skin and coat.

Every irresistibly delicious chewable tablet is packed with a comprehensive line-up of nutrients to help support healthy skin and a shiny coat!





Friday, June 22, 2018

Cat Adoption Tips

Courtesy of Life's Abundance and the June 2018 Newsletter:  Cat Adoption Made Simple:

June is Adopt-a-Shelter-Cat Month and we are ready to celebrate! Even though adopting a cat is rewarding, it is a big step. To make it more doable, we’ve broken that big step down into a bunch of manageable steps.

The week before: 

Gather supplies! Most cats prefer a dust-free, unscented clumping litter. They also usually prefer a litter box without a lid. Your cat will need water and food bowls, toys and something to scratch. You already know where to go for the perfect cat food!

Create a cozy space.
As a species that can be both predator and prey, cats like somewhere they can feel secure and safe. There are added bonus points if this space has some height, which is one of the reasons cats love tall cat trees so much.

Prepare a room.
During the first few days, plan to have your cat contained to a smaller space like a laundry room or bathroom while she adjusts to her new surroundings. Once she’s feeling braver, she'll be ready to explore on her own.

Prepare family members. If your family isn’t used to having a cat around, make sure they understand the basic rules about gentle play, and giving the cat space when they make it clear they would rather be alone. Older kids can be assigned chores such as feeding, brushing and litter box cleanup (they love that one.) Younger kids, especially toddlers, will need direct supervision as they often do not understand gentle play.


babycat



The first day: 

Congratulations, your cat is home! Now leave her alone. OK, maybe not entirely alone, but give her some time to explore her new surroundings without being stared at by multiple sets of strange eyes. If you have a dog, make sure he’s not sniffing loudly under the door or pawing at it thus scaring the heck out of the cat.

Make sure you have food. Cats can be very finicky, and many refuse to adjust to a sudden change in food. Plan on several days minimum, and maybe even several weeks or more, to adjust to a new food. It will be worth the effort.

Make a vet appointment. Always start a new life together with a clean bill of health! Vaccines may need updating, de-wormers may need to be given, and you’ll want to know if there are any health issues to be aware of.


The first few weeks:

Be patient! Social kitties may come out and cuddle right away, but others need a little more time. Don’t push a cat who’s not ready to be held or petted. Over time their personality will shine through!

Make that first vet visit. Ask the veterinarian if they are cat-friendly or use Fear Free practice guidelines, a new way of low-stress handling that minimizes the pet’s discomfort during visits. This is a great way to ensure a lifetime of good health!

Course correct as needed. Remember, you and kitty are going through a transitional period. She needs to learn about you just like you’re learning about her. If she scratches in the wrong place, doesn’t want to sleep in the new bed you bought, or kicks litter all over the floor, take a deep breath and remember that it’s all going to be all right. Don’t be afraid to enlist the advice of a vet or cat behaviorist if you are concerned.


cute cat


Just keep in mind, any new pet relationship may encounter some bumps, especially at the beginning. But, with love and patience, you too can make that deep connection and begin to forge a bond that will last a lifetime. It’s a lot of work, but well worth it to bring in a new family member!

Dr. V

Dr. Jessica Vogelsang, DVM

Friday, April 27, 2018

Why Do Cats Purr

Courtesy Of Life's Abundance from their April 2018 Newsletter:

The Amazing Reason Why Cats Purr




Most people believe cats purr when they are content or happy, end of story. While cats do purr when they are content, researchers attempting to uncover the answer to this 3,000-year-old mystery are finding the answer more complicated – and fascinating - than an expression of happiness.

All domestic cats purr, as do many wild cats, and purring occurs in a variety of situations. When cats purr in the presence of other unknown cats or kittens, the behavior may serve as a friendly greeting or to convey submissiveness. While it’s true that cats purr contentedly while on their pet parent’s lap, they also purr when they give birth, when they are frightened or even injured. Because kitties clearly cannot be content in all these situations, contentment or friendliness cannot be the only reason they purr.

babycat



So why else would they purr?

Natural selection tells us that a particular behavior or trait will persist through multiple generations only if it aids survival. For purring to exist in both domestic and wild cats, there must be something vital about the behavior. Purring is created by the vibration of the cat’s larynx and diaphragm, and therefore requires an expense of energy. If a kitty is sick, surely they wouldn’t burn calories unless it resulted in some sort of benefit, right?


We're all familiar with the expression “cats have nine lives”. Similarly, veterinarians have an old saying that if you put a cat who has broken bones in a room with other cats, the breaks will heal. In fact, cats are amazing self-healers: they have fewer post-operative complications than dogs, have a lower incidence of bone and joint disease than dogs, and 90% of cats survive high-rise falls! What could account for this remarkable set of facts, and is it related to purring?

In fact, there’s striking evidence that purring has healing properties. Researchers have found that vibrations in the frequency range between 25-50 hertz promote bone strength, stimulate healing of fractures, provide pain relief and help heal tendons and muscles. Bioacoustic researchers studied the purring of dozens of both domestic and wild cats, paying particular attention to frequency, pitch, loudness and duration of purring in relation to the cat’s behavior. Guess what they found? The purring is in the range of 25-50 Hz, the exact range associated with healing properties such as increased bone density!

Maybe this has something to do with a cat’s uncanny ability to heal. And just maybe purring is part of the reason why, when we fall ill, having a cat sit on our laps can actually make us feel better! Whether it is simply the comfort of having a friend nearby, or the vibrational frequencies of your kitty’s rumble, the joy of a cat purring on your lap is priceless.



References:

Rubin C, McLeod K. Promotion of bony in growth by frequency specific, low amplitude mechanical strains. Clinical Orthopedics and Related Research, 289, 165-174, 1994.

Elizabeth von Muggenthaler The felid purr: A healing mechanism? Proceedings from the 12th International Conference on Low Frequency Noise and Vibration and its Control. Bristol, UK, September 18-20, 2006.

Chen et al, The Effects of Frequency of Mechanical Vibration on Experimental Fracture Healing. Chinese Journal of Surgery, 32 (4), 217-219, 1994.

Leduc A, Lievens P, Dewald J. The influence of multidirectional vibrations on wound healing and on regeneration of blood and lymph vessels. Lymphology, 14(4), 179-85, 1981.

Rothschild BM, Rothschild C, Woods RJ. Inflammatory arthritis in large cats: an expanded spectrum of spondyloarthropathy. J Zoo Wildl Med. 1998 Sep;29(3):279-84.

Garman R, Gaudette G, Donahue LR, Rubin C, Judex S. Low-level accelerations applied in the absence of weight bearing can enhance trabecular bone formation. J of Orthop Res. 2007 Jun;25(6):732-40.

Lundeberg TC. Vibratory stimulation for the alleviation of chronic pain. Acta Physiol Scand Suppl. 1983;523:1-51.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Hearth Health in Cats and Dogs

Great article by Dr. Jane Bicks, courtesy of Life's Abundance and the February 2018 Newsletter:

When we think of February, Valentine's Day sucks up all the holiday energy in the room. With so much attention paid to the affairs of the heart, it's no accident that February is also Heart Health Awareness Month! And while the human heart plays the star role in these holidays, many of us care just as much (and maybe even more) about the healthiness of our companion animals' heart.

Most people have a basic understanding of the risks of heart disease in humans, but when it comes to canine and feline heart health, these areas remain a tad more mysterious.

In the following FAQs, we’ll look at some of the similarities between humans, dogs and cats, hopefully resulting a better appreciation of these amazing feats of biological engineering.

1. How Widespread is Heart Disease?

Humans: In America, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. Annually, about 610,000 people die of heart disease, accounting for a quarter of all deaths.

Dogs & Cats: Even though reliable statistics are not readily available for adult felines or canines, we do know that heart disease is not nearly as common as in humans. Only about 10% of dogs ever develop valvular heart disease. As with many maladies, risks for heart disease increase with age, especially for dogs over the age of nine (later for some breeds). Tracking heart disease in cats has proven challenging, as felines exhibit very few if any physical symptoms due to this condition.

2. What’s the Most Common Form of Heart Disease?

Humans: In adults, coronary artery disease is the most prevalent kind of heart disease. The main type involves accumulation of arterial plaque, which affects blood flow to the heart. As the layers of plaque thicken and harden, blood flow can be further restricted.

Dogs & Cats: The biggest difference here is that companion animals are not at-risk for coronary artery disease. While that’s good news, keep in mind they can face other medical conditions. For example, dogs can suffer from mitral valve disease or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Mitral valve disease describes a condition where a valve on the left side of the heart fails to close properly. The problem with this is that blood pools into the left atrium, rather than exiting the left ventricle. Older, small breeds are more likely to develop mitral valve disease, a condition that can be aggravated by periodontal disease. DCM weakens the heart muscle so that it pumps less vigorously and regularly, a condition more common in large breeds. Cats, on the other hand, are more likely to experience hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Here, the walls of the heart thicken, resulting in reduced muscle flexibility which decreases the volume of blood pumped. HCM is a genetic disease that is found in both pure and mixed breed cats.


3. What are the Symptoms of Heart Disease?

Humans: Symptoms vary depending on the disease, but patients with coronary artery disease often have chest pain, arm pain and shallow breathing. As the condition deteriorates, there’s a risk of heart attack.

Dogs & Cats: Dogs typically exhibit signs such as low energy, general discomfort, labored breathing and even a low-pitched, chronic cough. On occasion, they might actually pass out. Cats may also become lethargic, sleeping excessively or hiding for extended periods. It's also not uncommon for cats to lose their appetite. Some may even be at risk of blood clots, which in some cases may lead to pain and possible paralysis.

4. Is Exercise Equally Beneficial?

Humans: Yes, definitely! Exercise lowers the risk of heart attack and reduces stress, another risk factor for heart disease.

Dogs & Cats: The kinds of heart disease commonly found in cats and dogs can't be avoided through exercise. But, as with people, regular exercise will improve overall health and help prevent obesity in pets, which certainly factors on heart health.


5. One Thing Everyone Can Agree On - Eat Healthy!

It’s hard to overstate the importance of quality food for humans and for companion animals. While significantly more research has been done on the benefits of essential fatty acid supplementation in humans, the science demonstrates similar results for dogs and cats, too.

But how can you be certain that you and your companion animals are getting plenty of omega-3’s and omega-6's? By taking an ultra-refined supplement daily! To ensure you are getting the quality you and your pets deserve, choose an omega supplement that has an IFOS 5-Star Rating. This independent, third-party testing validates that you are getting a safe and effective supplement that you can feel confident giving to any member of your family! If you're in the market for a superior supplement, look no further than Life's Abundance Fish Oil Supplement for people and Ultra-Pure Fish Oil Supplement for dogs and cats!

Take care of your heart and it'll help take care of you!

Dr. Jane Bicks